/page/2
#latergram #birthday #family  #dirtytan #rnlife

#latergram #birthday #family #dirtytan #rnlife

nprglobalhealth:

5 Simple Habits Can Help Doctors Connect With Patients
I pulled back the curtain, ready to meet the next patient on my hospital rounds.
"Why are you standing there?" she asked me. "Come, have a seat, let’s talk."
Lenore could have been my grandmother. She was 77 years old, and all of 93 pounds. What she lacked in girth, she more than made up for in chutzpah. She was one of the patients from intern year who I’ll never forget.
After four years of medical school, I could recite biochemical pathways, genetic mutations and the ways all sorts of drugs work. But all the cramming suppressed most of my common sense. Perhaps manners, too.
Lenore was offering me a refresher course. How could I refuse her polite but firm invitation?
I’d never been encouraged to sit at a patient’s bedside — to stop hurrying for even a moment.
Our medical teachers put a premium on accuracy and efficiency, which became conflated with speed. Everything had to be fast.
In 2014, doctors still value speed and technical accuracy, but we also do more to consider the quality of care we give and whether patients are satisfied with it. Those goals aren’t just the right thing to do. There are often financial strings attached to getting them right.
Even so, interns today don’t sit much more often than they did back in my day.
In a recent study, Johns Hopkins researchers followed two groups of medical interns for a month and found they sat down at the bedside only 9 percent of the time.
Sitting down, which would seem like one of the simplest things to do, is the least practiced of five communication skills for doctors that Lenore would have endorsed and that research has shown can make a big difference in patient satisfaction.
The others include introducing oneself to the patient and explaining your role in the patient’s care. Touching the patient — whether it’s a handshake, a gesture of comfort or part of a physical exam — makes a difference, too.
And the old art of good conversation never goes out of style: Ask open-ended questions, like, “How are you feeling today?”
Medical educators should be role models for these common courtesies, says Dr. Leonard Feldman, the senior author of the study and director of an urban health residency program at Hopkins.
"Trainees take their cues from us," he tells Shots. "These behaviors are what constitute ‘bedside manner.’ " More than that, he says, sitting at the bedside projects body language that tells a patient, "I’m here for you. How can I be of service?"
Feldman prizes these basic but often overlooked human interactions in his trainees. He suggests simple solutions like making sure there’s a chair available next to every hospital bed.
During my own intern refresher course with Lenore those many years ago, I tried to sit in the chair next to her bed. She’d have none of it. “Here,” she said, patting the mattress and telling me where to park it. “Now, how is your day going?” she asked. An open-ended question. What a pro she was.
Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR.

nprglobalhealth:

5 Simple Habits Can Help Doctors Connect With Patients

I pulled back the curtain, ready to meet the next patient on my hospital rounds.

"Why are you standing there?" she asked me. "Come, have a seat, let’s talk."

Lenore could have been my grandmother. She was 77 years old, and all of 93 pounds. What she lacked in girth, she more than made up for in chutzpah. She was one of the patients from intern year who I’ll never forget.

After four years of medical school, I could recite biochemical pathways, genetic mutations and the ways all sorts of drugs work. But all the cramming suppressed most of my common sense. Perhaps manners, too.

Lenore was offering me a refresher course. How could I refuse her polite but firm invitation?

I’d never been encouraged to sit at a patient’s bedside — to stop hurrying for even a moment.

Our medical teachers put a premium on accuracy and efficiency, which became conflated with speed. Everything had to be fast.

In 2014, doctors still value speed and technical accuracy, but we also do more to consider the quality of care we give and whether patients are satisfied with it. Those goals aren’t just the right thing to do. There are often financial strings attached to getting them right.

Even so, interns today don’t sit much more often than they did back in my day.

In a recent study, Johns Hopkins researchers followed two groups of medical interns for a month and found they sat down at the bedside only 9 percent of the time.

Sitting down, which would seem like one of the simplest things to do, is the least practiced of five communication skills for doctors that Lenore would have endorsed and that research has shown can make a big difference in patient satisfaction.

The others include introducing oneself to the patient and explaining your role in the patient’s care. Touching the patient — whether it’s a handshake, a gesture of comfort or part of a physical exam — makes a difference, too.

And the old art of good conversation never goes out of style: Ask open-ended questions, like, “How are you feeling today?”

Medical educators should be role models for these common courtesies, says Dr. Leonard Feldman, the senior author of the study and director of an urban health residency program at Hopkins.

"Trainees take their cues from us," he tells Shots. "These behaviors are what constitute ‘bedside manner.’ " More than that, he says, sitting at the bedside projects body language that tells a patient, "I’m here for you. How can I be of service?"

Feldman prizes these basic but often overlooked human interactions in his trainees. He suggests simple solutions like making sure there’s a chair available next to every hospital bed.

During my own intern refresher course with Lenore those many years ago, I tried to sit in the chair next to her bed. She’d have none of it. “Here,” she said, patting the mattress and telling me where to park it. “Now, how is your day going?” she asked. An open-ended question. What a pro she was.

Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR.

(via npr)

On serving

I just saw “Lone Survivor” at Regal on route 1 and it may be that I’m in a humbled, grateful state of mind immediately post-viewing, but my desire to serve has been reawakened.

And god no, I’d never ever in all of eternity imagine myself cut out as a navy seal. So don’t think I’m that delusional.

I first wanted to enlist when I was in high school and considering options for my future. Marine recruiters would always visit my high school, talk to us, do fitness challenges, and ultimately try to convince us to walk towards that path of life. I knew I would probably die during Marine bootcamp due to my lack of fitness, but I thought I may cut it out in the army or elsewhere if I truly pushed myself. I told my mom one day and she initially wrung my neck. Just kidding, but she did not react positively. Nearing the end of my senior year, when I knew I’d be going to Rutgers for nursing, I mentioned it again. This time she was more understanding, even supportive. I couldn’t figure out what changed - maybe she knew that my acceptance into school would be too much of a good thing for me to pass up. Ultimately, I chose school and put aside this absurd urge to be in the military.

I can’t explain the allure. Something draws me and commands my awe upon seeing the perfectly donned uniforms, medals all in a row. I’m fascinated by the discipline and mannerisms of these men and women. The respect given and demanded, the order of command, and code of conduct - the whole culture leaves me enthralled, as if it were separate from American culture.

And while these individuals are American, it is a differently lifestyle. There is such discipline and a sense of accountability and responsibility that are fast waning in the civilian way of life. There is a sense of entitlement without having earned it that would never sustain in the military world. The culture is almost stuck in time - reflective of an age when chivalry, subtleties, and respect were still commonplace and expected. Now, I’m aware that bad things do occur in the military, amongst those who serve together even, but I do not hold them to perfection. I regard the forces as human, still, with room to err but just more civilized and lead by virtue and pride.

I was catching up with an old friend today and she mentioned how she had always wanted to become a doctor. We went to high school and nursing school together and I know that she is extremely and naturally intelligent. She has that type of effortless intelligence that I would have to study hours upon hours for. I’ve met very few people that I regard the way I do her. So, I was very supportive when she relayed how she had been considering med school again citing a sense of boredom or a lacking in her life as her provoker. This, a stagnancy and dissatisfaction with oneself, is something I could relate to. Especially now. I’ve been yearning for something else. And I realized it was up to me to open my own doors, as she has.

I’ve found a real place in nursing. It is something I can do all my life. Maybe not so much bedside nursing… But the concept of what it is to be a nurse - to care, be an advocate, utilize scientific, medical, and holistic knowledge, and maintain a set of trained skills- it’s fulfilling and I’m all in. I can see myself straying or dabbling in other things, like forensics and even history or education, but I’ll probably always find my way here. This way of serving is honest and selfless. Nursing is in the service industry, but you’re offering up much more than just comfort and turn down service. A nurse, more often than not, is offering his or herself when the reward may be little to none. It’s service to one’s community, one’s fellow man.

But I fear, and I always feared that someday I might look back and wonder why didn’t I enlist and serve my country? I understand it’s not for everyone. It’s a calling. I looked at my bf with disgust after the movie for complaining about the weather. I said, “How can you complain right now? Those guys were running around all shot up…be thankful that it’s only raining!” I got home and I sneered at the way my mom was so thoughtlessly gabbing on the phone, like there was nothing else going on in the world. “Gosh, how clueless,” I thought.

But then I realized how foolish I was/am. Who am I to judge when just earlier my biggest problem was which bras to purchase at the Victoria’s Secret sale? If anything I should have smiled at such trivial things and felt proud that there are men and women out there allowing for all of us to be on the phone freely or to only complain about the weather, rather than security and safety.

I applied to my dream school last month (finally). I’m not sure I’m good enough on paper. If they gave me a chance I would surely prove it, or try my hardest. It would mean everything to me to get accepted, but I would not feel defeated if I did not. Instead, maybe I’ll receive that info packet on army nursing and take a leap into something that both awes me and scares me. I have to at least answer the calling if it turns out that the path of school isn’t for me yet. I just pray that I’ll be able to discern what’s meant for me and to give myself wholly when given the opportunity to be of service.

npr:

Success is what we all strive for in life. But the truth is that behind every success sits a pile of failures. And that’s just the way it should be, says commentator Marcelo Gleiser.

npr:

Success is what we all strive for in life. But the truth is that behind every success sits a pile of failures. And that’s just the way it should be, says commentator Marcelo Gleiser.

(via coupdegrace)

#latergram #birthday #family  #dirtytan #rnlife

#latergram #birthday #family #dirtytan #rnlife

nprglobalhealth:

5 Simple Habits Can Help Doctors Connect With Patients
I pulled back the curtain, ready to meet the next patient on my hospital rounds.
"Why are you standing there?" she asked me. "Come, have a seat, let’s talk."
Lenore could have been my grandmother. She was 77 years old, and all of 93 pounds. What she lacked in girth, she more than made up for in chutzpah. She was one of the patients from intern year who I’ll never forget.
After four years of medical school, I could recite biochemical pathways, genetic mutations and the ways all sorts of drugs work. But all the cramming suppressed most of my common sense. Perhaps manners, too.
Lenore was offering me a refresher course. How could I refuse her polite but firm invitation?
I’d never been encouraged to sit at a patient’s bedside — to stop hurrying for even a moment.
Our medical teachers put a premium on accuracy and efficiency, which became conflated with speed. Everything had to be fast.
In 2014, doctors still value speed and technical accuracy, but we also do more to consider the quality of care we give and whether patients are satisfied with it. Those goals aren’t just the right thing to do. There are often financial strings attached to getting them right.
Even so, interns today don’t sit much more often than they did back in my day.
In a recent study, Johns Hopkins researchers followed two groups of medical interns for a month and found they sat down at the bedside only 9 percent of the time.
Sitting down, which would seem like one of the simplest things to do, is the least practiced of five communication skills for doctors that Lenore would have endorsed and that research has shown can make a big difference in patient satisfaction.
The others include introducing oneself to the patient and explaining your role in the patient’s care. Touching the patient — whether it’s a handshake, a gesture of comfort or part of a physical exam — makes a difference, too.
And the old art of good conversation never goes out of style: Ask open-ended questions, like, “How are you feeling today?”
Medical educators should be role models for these common courtesies, says Dr. Leonard Feldman, the senior author of the study and director of an urban health residency program at Hopkins.
"Trainees take their cues from us," he tells Shots. "These behaviors are what constitute ‘bedside manner.’ " More than that, he says, sitting at the bedside projects body language that tells a patient, "I’m here for you. How can I be of service?"
Feldman prizes these basic but often overlooked human interactions in his trainees. He suggests simple solutions like making sure there’s a chair available next to every hospital bed.
During my own intern refresher course with Lenore those many years ago, I tried to sit in the chair next to her bed. She’d have none of it. “Here,” she said, patting the mattress and telling me where to park it. “Now, how is your day going?” she asked. An open-ended question. What a pro she was.
Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR.

nprglobalhealth:

5 Simple Habits Can Help Doctors Connect With Patients

I pulled back the curtain, ready to meet the next patient on my hospital rounds.

"Why are you standing there?" she asked me. "Come, have a seat, let’s talk."

Lenore could have been my grandmother. She was 77 years old, and all of 93 pounds. What she lacked in girth, she more than made up for in chutzpah. She was one of the patients from intern year who I’ll never forget.

After four years of medical school, I could recite biochemical pathways, genetic mutations and the ways all sorts of drugs work. But all the cramming suppressed most of my common sense. Perhaps manners, too.

Lenore was offering me a refresher course. How could I refuse her polite but firm invitation?

I’d never been encouraged to sit at a patient’s bedside — to stop hurrying for even a moment.

Our medical teachers put a premium on accuracy and efficiency, which became conflated with speed. Everything had to be fast.

In 2014, doctors still value speed and technical accuracy, but we also do more to consider the quality of care we give and whether patients are satisfied with it. Those goals aren’t just the right thing to do. There are often financial strings attached to getting them right.

Even so, interns today don’t sit much more often than they did back in my day.

In a recent study, Johns Hopkins researchers followed two groups of medical interns for a month and found they sat down at the bedside only 9 percent of the time.

Sitting down, which would seem like one of the simplest things to do, is the least practiced of five communication skills for doctors that Lenore would have endorsed and that research has shown can make a big difference in patient satisfaction.

The others include introducing oneself to the patient and explaining your role in the patient’s care. Touching the patient — whether it’s a handshake, a gesture of comfort or part of a physical exam — makes a difference, too.

And the old art of good conversation never goes out of style: Ask open-ended questions, like, “How are you feeling today?”

Medical educators should be role models for these common courtesies, says Dr. Leonard Feldman, the senior author of the study and director of an urban health residency program at Hopkins.

"Trainees take their cues from us," he tells Shots. "These behaviors are what constitute ‘bedside manner.’ " More than that, he says, sitting at the bedside projects body language that tells a patient, "I’m here for you. How can I be of service?"

Feldman prizes these basic but often overlooked human interactions in his trainees. He suggests simple solutions like making sure there’s a chair available next to every hospital bed.

During my own intern refresher course with Lenore those many years ago, I tried to sit in the chair next to her bed. She’d have none of it. “Here,” she said, patting the mattress and telling me where to park it. “Now, how is your day going?” she asked. An open-ended question. What a pro she was.

Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR.

(via npr)

On serving

I just saw “Lone Survivor” at Regal on route 1 and it may be that I’m in a humbled, grateful state of mind immediately post-viewing, but my desire to serve has been reawakened.

And god no, I’d never ever in all of eternity imagine myself cut out as a navy seal. So don’t think I’m that delusional.

I first wanted to enlist when I was in high school and considering options for my future. Marine recruiters would always visit my high school, talk to us, do fitness challenges, and ultimately try to convince us to walk towards that path of life. I knew I would probably die during Marine bootcamp due to my lack of fitness, but I thought I may cut it out in the army or elsewhere if I truly pushed myself. I told my mom one day and she initially wrung my neck. Just kidding, but she did not react positively. Nearing the end of my senior year, when I knew I’d be going to Rutgers for nursing, I mentioned it again. This time she was more understanding, even supportive. I couldn’t figure out what changed - maybe she knew that my acceptance into school would be too much of a good thing for me to pass up. Ultimately, I chose school and put aside this absurd urge to be in the military.

I can’t explain the allure. Something draws me and commands my awe upon seeing the perfectly donned uniforms, medals all in a row. I’m fascinated by the discipline and mannerisms of these men and women. The respect given and demanded, the order of command, and code of conduct - the whole culture leaves me enthralled, as if it were separate from American culture.

And while these individuals are American, it is a differently lifestyle. There is such discipline and a sense of accountability and responsibility that are fast waning in the civilian way of life. There is a sense of entitlement without having earned it that would never sustain in the military world. The culture is almost stuck in time - reflective of an age when chivalry, subtleties, and respect were still commonplace and expected. Now, I’m aware that bad things do occur in the military, amongst those who serve together even, but I do not hold them to perfection. I regard the forces as human, still, with room to err but just more civilized and lead by virtue and pride.

I was catching up with an old friend today and she mentioned how she had always wanted to become a doctor. We went to high school and nursing school together and I know that she is extremely and naturally intelligent. She has that type of effortless intelligence that I would have to study hours upon hours for. I’ve met very few people that I regard the way I do her. So, I was very supportive when she relayed how she had been considering med school again citing a sense of boredom or a lacking in her life as her provoker. This, a stagnancy and dissatisfaction with oneself, is something I could relate to. Especially now. I’ve been yearning for something else. And I realized it was up to me to open my own doors, as she has.

I’ve found a real place in nursing. It is something I can do all my life. Maybe not so much bedside nursing… But the concept of what it is to be a nurse - to care, be an advocate, utilize scientific, medical, and holistic knowledge, and maintain a set of trained skills- it’s fulfilling and I’m all in. I can see myself straying or dabbling in other things, like forensics and even history or education, but I’ll probably always find my way here. This way of serving is honest and selfless. Nursing is in the service industry, but you’re offering up much more than just comfort and turn down service. A nurse, more often than not, is offering his or herself when the reward may be little to none. It’s service to one’s community, one’s fellow man.

But I fear, and I always feared that someday I might look back and wonder why didn’t I enlist and serve my country? I understand it’s not for everyone. It’s a calling. I looked at my bf with disgust after the movie for complaining about the weather. I said, “How can you complain right now? Those guys were running around all shot up…be thankful that it’s only raining!” I got home and I sneered at the way my mom was so thoughtlessly gabbing on the phone, like there was nothing else going on in the world. “Gosh, how clueless,” I thought.

But then I realized how foolish I was/am. Who am I to judge when just earlier my biggest problem was which bras to purchase at the Victoria’s Secret sale? If anything I should have smiled at such trivial things and felt proud that there are men and women out there allowing for all of us to be on the phone freely or to only complain about the weather, rather than security and safety.

I applied to my dream school last month (finally). I’m not sure I’m good enough on paper. If they gave me a chance I would surely prove it, or try my hardest. It would mean everything to me to get accepted, but I would not feel defeated if I did not. Instead, maybe I’ll receive that info packet on army nursing and take a leap into something that both awes me and scares me. I have to at least answer the calling if it turns out that the path of school isn’t for me yet. I just pray that I’ll be able to discern what’s meant for me and to give myself wholly when given the opportunity to be of service.

npr:

Success is what we all strive for in life. But the truth is that behind every success sits a pile of failures. And that’s just the way it should be, says commentator Marcelo Gleiser.

npr:

Success is what we all strive for in life. But the truth is that behind every success sits a pile of failures. And that’s just the way it should be, says commentator Marcelo Gleiser.

(via coupdegrace)

On serving

About:

"I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in life. And I am horribly limited."
-- sylvia plath

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